Fussy Neonate – a Jeopardy game!

Maya S. Iyer, MD, FAAP, Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Section of Emergency Medicine

Fussy Neonate Jeopardy

This jeopardy game highlights key clinical considerations for infants who present to the emergency department with the chief complaint of fussiness. In particular, the topics highlighted in this game include: fever in the neonate, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), brief resolved unexplained events (BRUE) and apparent life threatening events (ALTE), non-accidental trauma (NAT) and a potpourri of other interesting clinical conditions.  The questions require second order thinking. After completing this game, emergency medicine residents should be able to describe the cardinal signs and symptoms, management and possible complications of the above conditions.

 

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Benzos, Bleeding, Burns. Case Conference Review, November 8, 2017

 

Welcome back to another edition of Case Conference Review here at Academic Medicine Pearls at THE Ohio State University! Old Man Adams starts us off with a 38-year-old male with known history of alcohol abuse presenting via EMS for suspected EtOH withdrawal. On walking into the room, Dr. Adams is greeted with choice expletives and the subsequently refuses any vitals or to participate in the examination. The patient then promptly starts to seize, sending Dr. Adams down his alcoholic withdrawal seizure pathway.

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“Should You Find Yourself in Afghanistan.” A helpful tip from our Chief resident in this week’s Case Conference Summary

Conference moderator and forever resident Dr. Zach Adams leads off this week’s case conference with a 65-year-old female diabetic presenting with the always challenging chief complaint of a “room-spinning” dizziness, otherwise classified as vertigo. She describes it as worse with position, severe, and present intermittently for the past few days. Suspicious for peripheral vertigo, Dr. Adams performs the Dix-Hallpike maneuver (Figure 1). Seconds after placing the patient in the reclined position with head turned laterally, the patient displays strong rotary nystagmus and promptly vomits on Dr. Adams’ shoes. Confirming his suspicion for benign paroxysmal peripheral vertigo, Dr. Adams then successfully performs the Epley maneuver (Figure 2) to reposition the otoliths within the semicircular canal and relieve the patient’s vertigo.

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