Case Conference Summary, September 20, 2017

Thanks Dr. Daniel Francescon for putting this together from our recent Rapid Fire Case Conference!

AMP Case conference review 9/20/17

Welcome back to another installment of Academic Medicine Pearls from THE Ohio State University. This week’s presenters shared with us their stories of bleeding and rapidly declining respiratory statuses. Continue reading

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When to send the patient home? Medical Student Notes

Author: Hiro Miyagi OSU MS4 // Editor: Michael Barrie OSU EM Attending

Medical Student Corner – When do kidney stone patients need immediate intervention?

A 51yo female presents with an acute episode of severe right sided back pain with nausea and vomiting. Patient has a past medical history of HTN and chronic back pain. The pain is intermittent, described as sharp and stabbing 10/10 pain. She has not been able to tolerate any liquids since the onset of pain. The patient denies fevers or chills, with no recent infections or illnesses. No dysuria, but with mild urinary frequency. She has a past surgical history of appendectomy 30 years ago.

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Airway Corner with Dr. Kaide

Dr. Kaide’s Airway “tip of the month”

There was this hypothetical patient…who was being intubated.  As soon as the patient was paralyzed dark blood came pouring out into the mouth from an upper GI bleed. The resident immediately suctioned a continuous flow of blood from the airway. She could not see any airway structures because of the bleeding.  Now what?

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Case Conference Summary, August 16, 2017

Thanks to Dr. Daniel Francescon for putting together the following summary of Rapid Fire Case Conference, August 16th:

Dr. Schirm presents a case of a 47F with the common complaint of elbow pain. It has been worsening for the past three weeks and is exacerbated by movement, especially when lifting objects at her job. She denies any fevers or trauma to the area. Physical exam is significant for point tenderness over the lateral epicondyle with full range of motion. She is neurovascularly intact distally. Dr. Schrim forgoes an X-ray and diagnoses the patient with lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow).

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